Buying A Property to Renovate in Italy

Avoiding common mistakes when buying a property to renovate in Italy

Buying a renovation project in Italy is a common scenario. It is also a common scenario for these projects to end in heartache.

At De Tullio Law Firm we often don’t meet these buyers until after they have purchased a property. They have usually spent way more than they expected and need to fix problems.

The best advice we can give you is to engage an Italian lawyer before buying a property to renovate in Italy. It will save you time, money and anguish.

A Renovation property in Italy: the right project for you?

No matter how experienced you are, a renovation project anywhere can be a stressful and time-consuming process. Even more so if you live overseas, can only visit Italy periodically and you are not a fluent Italian speaker. Unless a project is guaranteed to give you your dream home, or make you money, think carefully. You may be taking on the wrong property.

Make sure you know exactly what you are buying

Don’t wait to discover major legal issues such as lack of planning permission until after your purchase is complete. Having a lawyer means you have someone to work on your behalf to conduct thorough due diligence. Any legal non­-compliances will be detected before you complete the purchase.

In addition, your lawyer will assist you in obtaining a structural survey. A survey of the property will reveal important information about construction and building materials. It will highlight problems and remedial actions. Moreover, it will give you a good indication of the likely cost of renovations. It is also worth commissioning a measured survey of the building. This will give you a detailed set of floorplans and elevations on which to base your proposed renovations.

Builders

Even minor renovations can turn into a nightmare if your builders or subcontractors fail to do a good job.

Always ask for references, and speak to previous clients. Your lawyer can help you hire reputable builders and can act as project manager on your behalf throughout the project.

Buying a renovation property in Italy: costs

Work always costs more than you expect. This is because you can’t foresee some problems until renovations start. You may have to change your mind or alter designs or specifications.

Always include a budget contingency of 10 – 20% to cover unforeseen costs and fully expect to spend it.

Make sure your plans are as detailed as possible; list all the tasks and materials and, who is going to do the work. Don’t forget to allow for skips, scaffolding, tools and plant hire. Estimate costs by comparing similar projects in the area. Make sure you, and/or your lawyer, get builders’ quotes.

We would recommend that you instruct your lawyer to draft a building contract with your chosen builder. A building contract makes the builder’s quote legally binding.

Heed Italian rules and regulations when buying a property to renovate

Under no circumstances, should you ignore requirements of the Italian law, as it will eventually catch up with you. Do not undertake any work without first checking whether you need to satisfy requirements such as planning and building permits.

You may also need to notify neighbours or others regarding your renovation plans. Your lawyer can advise you if property deeds contain restrictive covenants, leases or other overriding interests in the property and land.

What are the penalties if you don’t follow the Italian law?

You may think that you can obtain the required planning permission retrospectively. However this is not always possible. Even if you can make  a retrospective planning application, it may be rejected. Your illegal work could then  constitute a criminal offence. In this case, the Italian State may seize your property. Getting your property back will likely be a very lengthy and costly process.

Failure to obtain the relevant approvals, you will have to prove compliance. This may mean undoing completed work.

Breaching a restrictive covenant or the terms of a lease can lead to a court injunction, you may have to pay fines or even have to undo your renovations.

Before you can start renovations, you will probably need to do some demolition.  As building materials need careful disposal, demolition work is a procedure that will also require authorisation.

Finally …

With over 55 years of experience as specialist property lawyers throughout Italy, we strongly recommend that you seek independent legal advice before purchasing any property in Italy. If you have already purchased a property but have run into trouble and would like to discuss your situation, please get in touch. We can help!

 

You may also be interested in How to get a mortgage in ItalyBuilding a House in Italy: a short step by step guide

Off-Plan Property in Italy: Insurance And Guarantee

Energy Performance Certificate in Italy

What is an Italian Energy Performance Certificate?

If you are purchasing a property in Italy, an Italian Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) –  Attestato di Prestazione Energetica (APE)  is an essential document.

In Italy, only an accredited engineer or surveyor can issue an EPC. As well as describing various aspects of the property such as its dimensions, condition and age, an EPC estimates energy costs for an average household. For instance, costs for lighting, heating and hot water.

An EPC provides an assessment of energy efficiency on a scale ranging from A to G. Category A is the most efficient and G is the least efficient.

Is an Italian Energy Performance Certificate mandatory?

EPC certificateItalian law made EPCs mandatory in 2013.

An EPC helps inform the sale or purchase price of an Italian property.

When buying a property in Italy, we highly recommend that you ask to see its EPC as part of your due diligence. You should see the EPC before  you sign a deed of sale.

An EPC is valid for 10 years and the onus is on the seller or landlord to provide a potential tenant or buyer with an EPC.

How do you get an EPC in Italy?

In order to obtain an EPC, you need to engage a technician accredited by the relevant Italian Regional authorities. By law, only accredited technicians can issue an EPC certificate in Italy.

In order to issue an Italian EPC, the technician performs a site inspection of the property to assess it. The technician evaluates heat transfer and the health and safety of indoor environments.

Following a thorough analysis, the professional determines which category the property falls into and enters this on an EPC form. The EPC is then delivered to the new owner or tenant of the property.

Do I need an EPC to rent or buy an Italian property?

When buying or renting a property, it is important to view its EPC so that you can budget for heating and power. This way you can estimate future costs of your utility bills.

Finally …

If you would like more information about the Italian EPC, you can read more here or, get in touch with us at info@detulliolawfirm.com We are legal specialists for Italian property matters.

Posta Elettronica Certificata (PEC)

What is a PEC?

PEC stands for posta elettronica certificata. It is essentially a certified email, which has a legal value, like a digital version of a registered letter (lettera raccomandata).

A PEC guarantees legal certainty of the sender’s identity as well as the date and time the email was sent.
A PEC also guarantees that the recipient receives the email and its contents. When the recipient opens and reads your PEC email, you will receive notifications.

Why is a PEC address useful?

PEC is widely used in Italy to send official documents to public administration organisations and private companies. In fact, it is mandatory for Italian companies, public administration organisations and professionals such as lawyers, notaries and accountants to have a PEC address. You can check an organisation’s or professional’s PEC address here.

Although there is no obligation to have one, a PEC email is useful if you have an urgent matter, particularly if you are abroad. The recipient will receive  your PEC email almost immediately. You will therefore get a faster response.

Certain Italian public administration bodies must respond to correspondence within thirty days of receiving it. Whereas it might take several days for a recipeint to receive a registered letter, sending a PEC email will speed up the process yet, it has the same legal value as a registered letter.

In Italy you can use a PEC for a wide variety of official matters such as, requesting official appointments, information or documents. You can also send legal contracts and invoices.

How do you get a PEC address?

To send PEC email, you need to set up a PEC account. Italian providers include LegalMail, ArubaPEC, Postecert, Register.it, Libero.

To obtain a PEC address, you will need to visit your chosen provider’s website and follow the instructions to open your PEC account. This consists of inputting your personal information and uploading a copy of your identity document. Sometimes you will need to add your Italian tax code (codice fiscale). You then choose an address such as yourname@pec.it and a password – just like any other email account.

Costs start from a few Euros a year for a basic PEC account, which usually includes limited storage. The more services you require, for instance you might want additional storage, the more you will pay.

Finally …

If you need help setting up a PEC address, we are here to help. For over 55 years, De Tullio Law Firm has been providing international clients with independent legal advice. We offer services in all the major fields of Italian law

Get in touch at info@detulliolawfirm.com

 

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Italian Property Law: Personalise Your Preliminary Contract with Conditions

Should you use a one size fits all preliminary contract for your Italian property purchase?

Preliminary Contracts in Italian Property Purchases

Before you sign a preliminary contract for an Italian property purchase, it is crucial to think about your personal situation. For example, is your purchase contingent on getting a mortgage or do you need to sell another property in order to complete this purchase? If your purchase is subject to certain circumstances, you should personalise your preliminary contract by adding conditions precedent.

Italian estate agents often use a standard preliminary contract template. This type of one size fits all preliminary contract may not be appropriate for your situation.

In fact, generally speaking, this type of standard preliminary contract may expose you to legal risks and financial penalties. In a worst-case scenario, you may end up in court.

Tailor the preliminary contract to fit your specific needs by adding conditions precedent

Conditions precedent protect all parties when buying and selling property in Italy. However, to provide protection, conditional clauses must actually be written into the preliminary contract in order for them to be legally binding.

During the due diligence process, if you find you are unable to meet the conditions precedent in the preliminary contract, you may withdraw from the purchase process. Examples of conditions precedent include:

  • a property purchase being contingent on the buyer obtaining approval for a mortgage
  • a buyer needing to complete the sale of another property to free up funds for the deal to proceed
  • a buyer agreeing to purchase a property if it passes a property inspection and/or survey
  • an offer hinging on approval from the local authorities for zoning and building permits for improvements such as changing the internal layout, an extension or installing a swimming pool.

What sort of conditions are valid in an Italian preliminary contract ?

Any condition precedent must be objective and cannot depend exclusively on the will of one of the involved parties.

According to Italian law, a condition is null and void if it is considered as merely potestative, i.e. it is considered as being in the sole interests of only one of the parties to the contract.

The most frequent and important example of a condition precedent in Italian preliminary contracts relates to mortgage approval. It is clear that all parties to the transaction stand to lose out if the buyer cannot obtain a mortgage. Under Italian law, this condition precedent cannot be classified as a purely potestative condition.

If you are not fully certain of having the financial means necessary to complete your real estate investment and you are negotiating with a bank to obtain a mortgage or, if you need to sell another property to finance the purchase, we strongly advise that the preliminary contract should indicate this as a condition precedent.

We would recommend that you seek independent legal advice if you are buying property in Italy. Have your lawyer examine all paperwork before you sign anything.

Finally …

If you are looking at a real estate investment in Italy, why not talk to us? De Tullio Law Firm can advise and guide you throughout your Italian property purchasing journey. We have over 55 years of experience working with clients on their Italian and cross border property, family and inheritance matters. Get in touch.

 

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The New York Times features De Tullio Law Firm Advice

Buying basics: the Italian conveyancing process

In a previous contribution in The New York Times, De Tullio Law Firm focussed on buying property in Rome.

This time, The New York Times explores purchasing property on the Ligurian Riviera.

Information that De Tullio Law Firm provided is however also relevant for the whole of Italy.

The New York Times includes information about legal and notarial fees and Italian property tax costs.

“There are no restrictions on most foreigners buying real estate in Italy”, said Giandomenico De Tullio, a managing partner at the De Tullio Law Firm, which has offices in Italy and Britain.

“For complicated transactions and sales involving foreigners, it is a good idea to hire a bilingual lawyer as well”, said Mr. De Tullio, who estimated that a lawyer’s fee would be about 1 percent of the sales price. “In addition, there is a 22 percent value-added tax on both services”.

“The stamp duty is the buyer’s biggest closing cost, at 2 or 9 percent of the property’s assessed value, depending on whether it will be a primary residence or a second home”, Mr. De Tullio said. (“To get the primary-residence tax break, buyers must typically establish legal residence in the municipality within 18 months of buying the property”, he said.)

“Other closing costs include a building registry tax of 50 euros (about $62) and several other taxes and fees that add up to a few hundred euros. A rough estimate of closing costs on a 1 million euro property is around 30,000 euros (about $37,000)”, Mr. De Tullio said, but he added “that it can vary greatly.” Read the full article here.

Finally …

De Tullio Law Firm is an Italian property, inheritance and family law specialist. We have been assisting and guiding our clients with Italian investments for over 55 years. If you would like to discuss your investments in Italy, we are here to help. Please get in touch.

 

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How to get a mortgage in Italy

Can foreign nationals get a mortgage in Italy even if they are not residents?

mortgage in italy

The short answer is yes. However, compared to foreign nationals resident in Italy, it is more complex for non-resident foreign nationals with an income that comes from outside Italy.

There are fewer options when it comes to lenders who offer mortgages to non-residents in Italy, and receiving a negative response from lenders is not unusual.

It is crucial to follow the right procedures and seek advice from professionals. Providing a mortgage to non-resident foreign nationals differs from the domestic market. This is mainly because lenders put constraints on the level of mortgage borrowing. Usually, lenders will only offer mortgages of up to 60% of the property purchase price.

Lenders have to take a number of factors into consideration pursuant to the European Mortgage Credit Directive. These include the currency of your income and your age. Generally, the mortgagee should not exceed 75 – 78 years of age by the end of the mortgage term.

A lender will also take into account the level and the source of your income; whether you are self-employed or employed for example.

In addition, a lender will required proof of creditworthiness and that you have sufficient funds to make Italian mortgage instalment payments on top of any other mortgages and loans elsewhere.

What are the steps to getting a mortgage in Italy?

The first stage of the mortgage application procedure includes gathering documents. We would always recommend that you seek independent legal advice at this stage. Your lawyer will be able to advise you what documents you need, identify whether you qualify for a mortgage and how best to proceed with your application.

Usually, obtaining financial pre-approval from a mortgage lender takes 3 – 4 weeks in Italy. The second stage of the mortgage application involves due diligence requested by the lender. This will entail getting a legal report and a technical survey of the property you want to purchase. If technical and legal assessments are accepted by the lender, the mortgage application will progress to the lender’s final approval.

It is essential to highlight that the real estate you wish to buy with your mortgage must be habitable and in compliance with current Italian technical, energy performance and building regulations on the matter. In the event that finalising your Italian property purchase is contingent on obtaining a mortgage, it is vital that the property you wish to buy meets the stated requirements of habitability and technical regulations. You should also make sure that the preliminary contract reflects the fact that your purchase is subject to getting a mortgage.

Finally …

For over 55 years, De Tullio Law Firm has been providing international clients with independent legal advice. We offer services in all the major fields of Italian law with particular expertise in real estate and inheritance matters. Get in touch.

Buying Property in Italy

The Italian property market

Dreaming of buying property in Italy? The country’s rich heritage, magnificent buildings, cities steeped in history and regions with landscapes are as sublime as they are varied. This territorial diversity and widely different prices per square metre of property make the Italian real estate market very interesting.

Property Prices

The average price per square metre for Italian property was around €2,300 at the end of 2019.

However, it was much lower in southern Italy. In Puglia for example, it is possible to buy a house for 1,300 €/m².

If you’re looking for a property in Florence or Venice, prices are much higher: expect to pay more than 5,000 €/m² for an apartment in Venice.

Fees and taxes

Before committing to the purchase of a property in Italy, it is essential to consider the inherent costs.

First of all, as a foreign national, you are more likely to use a real estate agent. Estate agent fees vary and can be as much as 4% of the selling price, i.e. €12,000 for a property worth €300,000.

In Italy, a notary public (Notaio) must oversee the transaction on behalf of the Italian state. The notary’s fees are also variable: allow for between 2% and 4%.

However, in Italy, the most important fees are the registration fees, which represent 9%, or €27,000 for a property worth €300.000. That said, these costs should be put into perspective, as the rate is based on the land registry (cadastral) value of the property, which is generally lower than the actual value.

As for property taxes, they vary between 0.46% and 1.06% per annum. Nonetheless, these are costs that should be anticipated before buying a property in Italy.

Purchasing property in Italy: the legal steps

It is crucial to clarify the situation before buying. Italian property law is complex and may differ from your own country. You should always seek independent legal advice before signing any paperwork.

Reservation Offer

Once you decide to purchase a property, you and the vendor will sign a reservation offer. This is an irrevocable letter of intent to purchase (proposta irrevocabile d’acquisto) and means the vendor agrees to remove the property from the market for a defined period of time – usually two weeks.

Due Diligence

While the property is off the market, you should conduct legal checks and searches into the property. This includes verifying property ownership, planning permits, zoning regulations and mortgages on the property. In addition, we would recommend that you have a property survey conducted.

Deposit

Following your due diligence if you decide to proceed with the purchase, you will have to pay a deposit. If the sale falls through, you will get your deposit back in full. If on the other hand you continue to completion, the deposit will form part of the agreed purchase price.

It is advisable to sign a preliminary contract (contratto preliminare di vendita), even though it is not a compulsory step in the process. Having a preliminary contract allows you to fix terms and conditions of the sale based on your due diligence.

Deed of Sale

Any conditions contained in the preliminary contract will be included in the deed of sale (atto di vendita), which you sign when you complete the transaction.

It should be noted that when one of the two parties does not understand Italian, a second draft of the deed in your language is required, but the Italian version of the deed will prevail in a court of law.

Finally

For more comprehensive information about the Italian property purchasing process, you might like to read our guide. If you would like to discuss your situation or, if we can be of assistance, please get in touch.

1 Euro Houses in Italy

1 Euro houses in Italy: too good to be true?

In recent years, to combat dwindling populations in rural areas of Italy, a number of Italian villages, have been launching charm offensives by putting a number of houses up for sale for the symbolic sum of 1 Euro.

The aim of local municipalities is to attract Italian and foreign investors to revitalise their areas. Cinquefrondi in Calabria is the latest Italian town to launch 1 Euro houses in Italy for sale.

Although these 1 Euro property schemes seem attractive, it may be wiser to pass on them. The €1 schemes are widely advertised and, with so many people expressing interest in these homes, there are always more applications than homes available.

How do you buy 1 Euro houses in Italy?

Whereas other towns selling homes for 1 Euro have required a deposit of up to €5000 that buyers forfeit if they fail to renovate the house within three years, Cinquefrondi is requesting an annual €250 fee for an insurance policy, payable until renovation works are complete.

Located in the historical centre of Cinquefrondi, properties are roughly 40 – 50 square metres in size. New owners will be liable to a fine of €20,000 if they do not complete their renovation projects within three years.

1 Euro houses at auction

As with all 1 Euro house schemes around Italy, sales take place in public auction (vendita con incanto).

It’s impossible to tell what you are taking on just from looking at a few photos of a property.

In some countries house auctions are common. In Italy however, they are not. The vendor’s lawyer does not prepare a set of documentation known as a, “legal pack”. Legal packs contain essential information including official titles and searches, property information and planning permission are therefore not available. In effect, you are responsible for conducting property-related searches.

To avoid buying what seems like a bargain but subsequently turns out to be a money pit, it is advisable that you go and inspect the property before you decide to make a bid. Obviously, this may not be possible because of time constraints and it can become costly. As you may not speak fluent Italian or have the expertise to assess what you are bidding for, we would recommend that you seek independent legal advice and professional expertise in Italy to evaluate the property before you submit a bid.

1 Euro is just the opening bid for properties

In fact, usually properties end up costing at least €20.000 at auction. On top of this, there is the legal requirement to renovate within a specific time frame. These properties therefore often end up costing a minimum of €50.000.

There are plenty of other reasonably-priced houses in Italy without the terms and conditions attached to €1 property schemes. These properties may be a better option for you.

Finally…

If you are thinking of applying to buy a 1 euro house in Italy, or any other property in Italy, at De Tullio Law Firm, we can help you with everything from property checks and searches, to facilitating the transaction, liaising with construction companies, obtaining Italian residence and providing tax and inheritance advice.

 

Homes for 1 Euro in Sambuca, Sicily (Italy)