Cura Italia Decree. March 2020

Wide-ranging central bank and government policies and stimulus packages are supporting the economy during the COVID pandemic. The Italian government has moved quickly to activate a fiscal package to support businesses and individuals through the crisis.

The measures introduced in the “Cura Italia Decree” take a three pronged approach. Firstly, they aim to reinforce the health sector through these difficult times. Secondly, they help alleviate the impact of the COVID pandemic on business in general and thirdly they support daily life for individuals and families.

Below we summarise some of the measures included in the Cura Italia Decree.

Cura Italia Decree. Suspension of payments

VAT registered companies and professionals with their fiscal domicile, registered office or place of business in Italy, whose turnover did not exceed €2 million in the fiscal year preceding the entry into force of the Cura Italia Decree, are eligible to defer the following payments:

– VAT (balance due on the VAT return and payment due on February 2020)

– Withholding Tax on employee / similar  income

– Social Security Contributions

These payments are now due by 31/05/2020 either in full or they can be made in 5 equal instalments starting from May 2020. No interest or penalties are applicable.

Cura Italia Decree. Suspension of obligations due between 08/03/2020 – 31/05/2020

 

  Previous Due Date New Due Date
VAT Return 30/04/2020 30/06/2020
TR Form 30/04/2020 30/06/2020
Esterometro (Jan./Feb./ Mar.) 30/04/2020 30/06/2020
Intra Form 25 monthly taxpayer or quarterly 30/06/2020
SSP Form 30/04/2020 30/06/2020
EAS Form 31/03/2020 30/06/2020

Dates for Income tax returns have not been extended and must therefore be submitted on 30/11/2020 and 30/06/2020 respectively.

There have also been no changes to income tax payment deadlines. That is to say, based on the self-assessment system, payments are due in June (30/06/2020) and November (30/11/2020) respectively.

Regarding companies, the Cura Italia Decree provides an extension for approval of financial statements to 180 days from the end of the financial year. In addition it allows for a deferment of tax payments. Given travel restrictions, annual general meetings to approve financial statements can move online via for example, video-conferencing.

  Date Income tax payments
Approval within 120 days from end of 2019 30/04/2020 (regular) 30/06/2020 – 30/11/2020
Approval within 180 days from end of 2019 28/06/2020 31/07/2020 – 30/11/2020
Approval within 180 days from end of 2019 (maximum add 30 days) 28/07/2020 31/08/2020 – 30/11/2020

IMU (property tax), payment deadlines also remain as is: 16th June, 2020 and 16th December, 2020.

Cura Italia Decree: Suspension of payments due between 2/3/2020 – 30/04/2020 for hospitality and leisure sector

The government has extended payments by one month for companies in the tourism-hotel sector with reference to VAT, withholding tax, social security contributions. However, these tax liabilities must be paid in full by 31/05/2020 or in 5 instalments from that date.

Cura Italia Decree: Payments to Tax Collection Agency (Agenzia Riscossione)

The Cura Italia Decree provides for the suspension of tax payments due in the period between 08/03/2020 and 31/05/2020 arising from bills issued by Tax Collection Agencies.

In addition, a suspension also applies to notices issued by the Italian Customs Agency as well as injunctions and further collection notices issued by municipalities or local authorities.

Furthermore, a suspension also applies to payments of facilitated settlement of tax bills (Rottamazione-ter). Instalments due in February will now therefore be payable on 31/05/2020.

Other liabilities

Payments on debts to other collection agencies (Agenzia Riscossione) including for instance INPS and Italian Customs that are payable between 8/03/2020 – 31/05/2020 have been deferred until 30/06/2020. However, suspension of payments does not extend to payment reminder notices from the Italian tax authority (Agenzia delle Entrate).

Other measures

A tax credit of 60% on rent for commercial premises (cadastral category C/1) for March 2020.

Companies can activate lay-off procedures. The Cura Italia Decree includes provisions in order to support employers who are facing a reduction or suspension of activities due to the Covid-19 emergency. This means employers can use a simplified procedure to apply for ordinary social security funds (cassa integrazione) for employees who were already employed by 23 February 2020. This support lasts for a maximum of nine weeks and, in any case, no later than August 2020.

In consideration of the lockdown of several economic sectors in Italy, additional indemnity payments for registered VAT self-employed entrepreneurs or professionals who do not benefit from specific social security coverage have been agreed. Payments of Euro 600.00 per month in lieu of income. Although procedures have yet to be announced, the payment of this allowance will be borne by INPS.

Requests for a suspension of first home mortgage payments is to be made to the relevant credit institution.

Finally …

While this summary does not provide an exhaustive explanation of the contents of the Cura Italia Decree, it aims to provide a brief overview of the measures that the Government has adopted. Although details regarding the implementation of measures are pending, each of the measures has specific requirements that will be implemented by provisions issued on a ministerial and regional level. Get in touch for additional information.

You may also like to read about how the pandemic has impacted the Italian property market.

Italian Real Estate Agency Services

Italian Real Estate Agency Services

A real estate agents’ role is to connect vendors with buyers

The first step in purchasing a home in Italy is to look for properties that you like. For this, services of a licensed real estate agent provide invaluable support.

Real estate agents facilitate property transactions. They provide relevant information to buyers and vendors. However, Italian real estate agents have no legal obligation to undertake searches of a technical or legal nature (due diligence).

Clearly, a lack of due diligence could in the first instance impact the transaction itself. Further down the line, if you didn’t conduct due diligence prior to buying, you might run into issues. You may discover the property lacks of full or partial planning permission or that renovations do not conform with building regulations. Crucially, a lack of due diligence may effect the future saleability of your property.

Real estate agents in Italy are of course required to disclose information based on the principles of a professional duty of care. This implies an obligation to provide information on any circumstances or issues that potential buyers should know about. Imparting incorrect or false information to an interested party is illegal.

Real estate agents have a duty of care

In 2012, the  Milan Court of Appeal heard a case regarding an estate agency’s duty of care: ruling no. 307 filed on 27th  January 2012.

Clients of a real estate agency took them to court on the grounds that the agent had failed to provide relevant information on adverse encumbrances on a property the clients wished to purchase.

The clients sued the real estate agent for a refund of the €6,000 commission fee they had paid to the agency. They argued that the real estate agency had been derelict in their duty of care. The clients claimed that the real estate agency should have communicated the existence of two mortgage transcriptions on the property. They maintained they would not have signed a reservation offer or a preliminary contract had they known. Signing the latter triggered the commission payment to the real estate agent.

The court dismissed the case.

The onus is on potential buyers to conduct pre-purchase due diligence

In support of the court decision, the judge stated that legal searches did not form part of a real estate agent’s responsibilities. In other words, technical and legal investigations, including land registry, planning, zoning and mortgage searches on a property do not form part of a real estate agent’s remit.

What does Italian law say about the scope of real estate agency services?

Article 1759 of the Italian Civil Code requires real estate agents to notify parties of all known circumstances concerning a property transaction.

In this case,  the real estate agency had done this. They argued that as they had no prior knowledge of the encumbrances, they could not have informed the clients of their existence. The real estate agency had only become aware of the mortgage transcriptions when the clients informed them. The clients had only learned of the encumbrances when they were about to complete the sale.

There was no evidence that the real estate agency had any knowledge of the mortgages. The judge ruled they had not wilfully omitted to advise the clients about the adverse encumbrances. The responsibility for ascertaining this information did not lie with the real estate agent but, with the purchaser.

Article 1176 of the Italian Civil Code states that performance of checks and searches related to a property is not part of the agent’s professional duty of care. Furthermore, estate agents are neither legally responsible, nor qualified, to conduct in-depth due diligence.

Anything pertaining to the legal and technical due diligence of Italian property purchases should therefore be handled by legal and technical professionals.

Real estate agents facilitate the search for an Italian property

However, Italian real estate agents do not provide due diligence services.

When buying or selling a property at home, most people wouldn’t dream of entering into a transaction without the assistance of a lawyer and a surveyor. These are the professionals who conduct legal and technical searches and checks. Yet all too often, we meet foreign buyers who have decided to rely on what an estate agent tells them about a property.

Finally …

The reality is that a property transaction in Italy is an investment. It can quickly become costly – both financially and emotionally if things go wrong. In addition, there are the complexities of the Italian legal, tax and administrative systems. On top of this, there are the language barriers.

Essentially, in order to avoid any problems and before you sign any paperwork, you should engage an experienced, independent lawyer. The need for legal advice is far greater for an overseas transaction than when buying property at home.

De Tullio Law firm specialises in cross-border residential and commercial property transactions in Italy. We recommend that before you sign any paperwork with an estate agent that you seek independent legal advice.

Get in touch if you feel unsure about anything property-related and need advice.

 

You may also be interested in How to get a mortgage in Italy

International Succession

Foreign nationals with a second home in Italy are subject to international succession procedures

International succession pertains to the estate of a person who dies in a country other than that of their nationality or residence.

It is likewise applicable to someone who leaves movable or immovable assets in a country other than that of their citizenship or residence. If, for example, you are a foreign national who owns a second home in Italy, your estate will be subject to international succession procedures.

In August 2015 new EU regulations governing inheritance came into force. These regulations, known as Brussels IV, aim to simplify and accelerate international inheritance matters and make cross-border succession procedures more efficient. Prior to the introduction of Brussels IV, international succession laws differed from country to country.

Since its introduction, there have now been a number of cases regarding the interpretation of the new EU regulations. One such international succession case came to court in Salerno in 2018.

The case involves two brothers who co-owned three properties in Italy. In 2016 one of the brothers, an Italian citizen, died in New York where he was a resident. He died intestate meaning he didn’t leave a Will.

One of the decedent’s six brothers is a co-owner of the three Italian properties. He took legal action to wind up the Italian property co-ownership. He subsequently filed an inheritance claim for his brother’s share in the property.

Article 24 paragraph 1 of EU Regulation 1215/2012 (so-called “Brussels I bis”) governs dissolutions of co-ownerships. It entrusts such cases to the court of the country in which the property is located. In this case therefore, Italy.

To make life simpler for those you leave behind, it is crucial to have a Will.

For estate divisions, the court in Salerno applied the Brussels IV regulation.

Article 4 of the regulation establishes that the jurisdiction which rules on the succession as a whole, is that of the country where the deceased was habitually resident at the time of death. However, Article 10 provides for subsidiary jurisdiction of courts in which the estate is located – if the deceased was a national of that country at the time of death.

Returning to the case in question. The court of Salerno considered that the deceased was habitually resident in the State of New York. It therefore ruled that the case should be governed by the law of New York State.

Adding to the complexity of this case, rules of private international law are also relevant. The rules governing New York private international law provide that the law of the place where the property is located applies to successions concerning immovable assets.

The judge has adjourned the case until parties produce U.S. regulatory sources. This is something of a landmark case. It sets a precedent inasmuch that judges have the power and duty to ascertain foreign regulatory sources of their own volition.

Although Regulation 650/12 aspires to harmonise international succession, in terms of effectiveness it is confusing and open to interpretation.

For international succession and division of estates, Italian inheritance law specifically provides for rights to so-called, “forced heirs”. Their inheritance quota is guaranteed.

However, in countries with common law systems, such as the UK and the USA, testators can rule on how estates should be divided.

Brussels IV allows testators to make a choice of law in their Will

International Succession Planning

Article 22 of Brussels IV allows individuals resident overseas to elect which country law should govern their inheritance.

Where individuals have multiple nationalities, they may elect to have any one of their nationalities apply to their Italian assets.

In effect, this means that you can avoid any jurisdictional confusion after your death. However, you need to take action by making, “Choice of Law Codicil” in your Will.

Finally …

If you are in the process of drafting, or reviewing, your Will, you should consider aspects such as foreign matrimonial regimes, usufruct, tax consequences, joint ownership structures and other foreign proprietary rights before deciding which law to apply to the devolution of your estate.

Should you need further information concerning the topic, our legal professionals will be happy to discuss your situation. Please contact De Tullio Law Firm at the following email address: info@detulliolawfirm.com

 

You may also be interested in Applying A Power of Attorney in Italy

De Tullio Law Firm at Your Overseas Home Property Seminar

Your Overseas Home Property events help people buy and move abroad safely

De Tullio Law Firm at Your Overseas Home Property SeminarProperty Guides and The Overseas Guides Company (OGC) regularly run free events to help people buy property and move abroad safely and risk-free.

Kim Brown founded OGC some 15 years ago. Kim’s parents had bought a home in Cyprus in 2004. However, without access to the right information and with some contacts who turned out to be untrustworthy, it sadly ended unhappily.

High -quality, carefully researched guidance

Seeing the impact on her parents, Kim was determined not to let this happen to anyone else – and so she set up OGC to provide high-quality, carefully researched guidance for anyone buying their dream home abroad.

Kim soon realised that in-depth information alone was just the first step.
“People also needed expert, trustworthy contacts to help them act on that information and turn their dream into reality. We now call these the ‘Golden Three’: your estate agent, your lawyer and your currency specialist”.

OGC has developed an extensive network of trustworthy experts across fourteen countries. They are all tried and tested to ensure the very best service.

Your Overseas Home Property Seminars started in 2017. Since then, a number of events have taken place around the UK. They have helped many people to buy safely overseas.

Expertise

Experts at the Your Overseas Home Property Seminar include leading Italian estate agents, currency, Italian law, finance and removals experts.

As well as seeing plenty of Italian homes at Your Overseas Home, you have the time and opportunity to discuss your personal requirements and get advice on all aspects of buying a property in Italy.

Finally …

De Tullio Law Firm regularly participates at The Your Overseas Home events. We have over 55 years of experience managing cross border property and inheritance matters throughout Italy. If you would like to discuss your personal situation but are unable to attend a Your Overseas Home event, why not get in touch with us today?

 

You may also be interested in our Guide To Buying Property in Italy.